Featured Posts

Building Family-Friendly Campuses: Strategies to Promote College Success Among Student Parents

While the share of parents enrolled in college has been steadily growing—according to the most recent data, the proportion of students with dependent children has increased 30 percent from 2004-12—the share of parenting students who complete college remains low. Melanie Kruvelis of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research looks at steps institutions can take to better understand and support students with families.

Beyond Graduation Rates: Why the Data Matter—and Why They Don’t

Carol Anderson and Patricia O’Brien of the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education in New England discuss the Graduation Rate Information Project, an initiative to address low graduation rates at the institutions their organization accredits.

Food Is a Basic Need: Dealing With Hunger on College Campuses

Wick Sloane writes that more data is needed on the issue of campus hunger before a comprehensive solution can be advanced—and on that score, an upcoming study from Government Accountability Office is a welcome development. This is the second post in a new series, Beyond the Margins: Meeting the Needs of Underserved Students.

ACE at 100: Lifting Nontraditional Learners to Postsecondary Success

Helping more Americans gain access to and graduate from college has been a large part of ACE’s mission ever since the Council was formed in 1918 to help soldiers returning from World War I gain a college degree. And it continues to play a central role today, as we prepare to celebrate our centennial.

A New Accountability for Broadening Participation in STEM

Developing an appropriate accountability system for broadening participation is crucial to achieving a STEM workforce that reflects the diversity of the American population. Colleges and universities, on the front line of STEM research and education, must lead the way.

On Being Provincial and Global: International Education at American Comprehensive Regional Universities

If we want to teach more future leaders, members of the workforce, and citizens to engage constructively with the world, they must learn at public regional universities that define themselves by their global engagement, writes Brian Stiegler of Salisbury University.