Featured Posts

Serving Post-traditional Learners

What do we know about post-traditional learners, and how can we better help them earn the higher education credentials they need to succeed? Jonathan Gagliardi and Louis Soares on the results of a new ACE report, The Post-traditional Learners Manifesto Revisited.

Moving Away From Data Invisibility at Tribal Colleges and Universities

The invisibility of Native American perspectives—those of Native students, researchers and their communities—continues to plague higher education, despite numerous calls for action from educational advocates across the country. Christine Nelson of the University of Denver considers what can be done to solve this problem.

AANAPISIs: Ensuring Success for Asian American and Pacific Islander Students

Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions play a unique role in ensuring success for a complex, heterogeneous, and quickly growing population of students, according to Dina C. Maramba of Claremont Graduate University.

How Predominantly Black Institutions Help Low-Income, First-Generation African American Students Succeed

Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) are not well understood in the higher education lexicon, despite serving a large number of students of color: namely, a large number of black or African Amer­ican students. Robert T. Palmer and Jared Avery of Howard University look at the role of PBIs in facilitating access and success for low-income, first-generation students of color.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Fostering Familial Learning Environments for Student Success

By embracing expansive ideas of success, HBCU leaders inspire their students to strive beyond degree completion and understand how collaboration, civic engagement, and entre­preneurship are essential attributes in a new knowledge economy and global citizenry.

Helping College Students Make Informed Student Loan Decisions

Recent surveys demonstrate that many college students do not know whether they have borrowed or how much debt they have accrued during college. What can higher education institutions—and the federal government—do to help?