ACE at 100: Lifting Nontraditional Learners to Postsecondary Success

Helping more Americans gain access to and graduate from college has been a large part of ACE’s mission ever since the Council was formed in 1918 to help soldiers returning from World War I gain a college degree. And it continues to play a central role today, as we prepare to celebrate our centennial.

NOVA-Mason Partnership Provides Guided Pathways for Transfer Students

George Mason University and Northern Virginia Community College have expanded upon an existing partnership to provide “guided pathways” for transfer students through ADVANCE: A NOVA Mason Partnership.

Morgan State University Paving the Way for Adult Learners Through CPL

Research shows that adult learners are more likely to enroll in, persist in and complete postsecondary education programs when institutions recognize students’ previous experiences and grant credit for prior learning. With a boost from ACE’s Center for Education, Attainment and Innovation’s College and University Partnerships, Morgan State University, the largest historically black college and university in Maryland, is doing just that.

University of Memphis Program Helps Students Cross the Finish Line

Many colleges and universities across the country are looking for effective ways to boost completion rates and help the millions nontraditional students who have some college credit but no degree. The University of Memphis Finish Line Program is an example of one initiative that has seen success with its efforts to reach out to students who have “stopped out,” abandoning their dreams of a college education.

Transfer Students, Transfer Policies

From 50-State Comparison: Transfer and Articulation Policies, Education Commission of the States. Two new reports out this week look at college student transfer rates and articulation policies throughout the country.

VIDEO: Exploring Military Credit Mobility and Postsecondary Attainment

This video accompanies the newly released Quick Hit brief, “Credit Mobility and Postsecondary Attainment: A Multi-State Approach to Military Credit.”

How to Navigate the Credentialing Maze

The stunning increase in the number and variety of credentials available in this country—college degrees, educational certificates, industry credentials, licensures, and most recently micro-credentials, such as digital badges—seems like a positive thing. However, the complex and fragmented nature of the credentialing marketplace is having the opposite effect—mass confusion.

VIDEO: Rethinking Credentialing

This video accompanies the newly released Quick Hit brief, “Rethinking Credentialing.” The paper and video are the latest in a series of Quick Hit briefs on current and emerging topics in higher education attainment and innovation.

Student Spotlight: From Missiles to UMUC

Welcome to the first installment of our new Student Spotlight series, featuring the stories of students who have used ACE credit recommendations for military and corporate training.

Southern Utah University Program Saves Time & Tuition

Southern Utah University is hoping to save its students time and tuition spent on general education requirements through a specialized new program called Jumpstart GE. The program will launch this fall with an initial cohort of 50 freshmen, who will register for the same 17 credits per semester, cutting general education requirements down to one year instead of the typical two.

UMass Attracts Community College Honors Students With New Scholarship

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has launched a new scholarship program designed to encourage top students from the commonwealth’s community colleges to finish their bachelor’s degrees. The scholarship will expand on the work of MassTransfer, an initiative to encourage students to take advantage of community college’s lower costs before completing their degrees at UMass.

Credit  for  Prior  Learning:  Why  All  the  Controversy?

Does the acceptance of prior learning actually lead to less or more revenue for colleges and universities? We don’t know yet, because no one has really researched the impact on institutions’ bottom lines. This research, while not easy, is necessary, writes Deborah Seymour.