Talking About Race, Class and College Access

Issues of equitable access and changing demographics weigh heavy on the shoulders of American higher education – and rightly so, write ACE’s Lorelle Espinosa and Matthew Gaertner of Pearson’s Center for College & Career Success. In this post, Espinosa and Gaertner discuss the takeaways from a recent convening on college access and success for minority and low-income students.

Supporting First-Generation and Low-Income Students at the University of Florida

First launched in 2006, the Machen Florida Opportunity Scholars Program supports nearly 1,250 undergraduates annually and will soon surpass the 2,000 alumni milestone. For the first-generation and low-income students in the program, early estimates indicate that they are 44 percent more likely to graduate in four years and 47 percent more likely to complete in six years compared to their peers.

Maricopa Community Colleges Help Foster Youth Transition to Success

Maricopa Community Colleges (AZ) recently launched a new project aimed at creating a community of support and access for youth aging out of the foster care system. The “Bridging Success Initiative” will help foster children get into and complete college by focusing on retention, degree completion and transfer.

VIDEO: Race, Class, and College Access

Watch Lorelle Espinosa, assistant vice president of ACE’s Center for Policy and Research Strategy, review the findings from ACE’s new report, “Race, Class, and College Access: Achieving Diversity in a Shifting Legal Landscape” at a convening July 21.

UC San Diego Expands College Opportunities for Native Youth

Despite increases in postsecondary enrollment over the past decade, Native American youth don’t always view college as an option. That’s why the University of California, San Diego is partnering with the Sycuan and Viejas tribes to promote college culture in the San Diego region.

Mapping New Pathways for Native Youth

While 208,838 American Indian and Alaska Native students were enrolled in college in 2012—a 17 percent increase from 2004—46 percent are first-generation and low-income, a population that often struggles with college completion. As the White House gears up for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, Christine Nelson looks at efforts to expand higher education opportunities for these students.

VIDEO: Equity and Innovation in Higher Education

Louis Soares, vice president for ACE’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy, moderates a discussion between Sheryll Cashin and Cheryl Crazy Bull during the first ACE Annual Meeting Ideas Forum.

Will Performance-Based Funding Further Disadvantage Disadvantaged Students?

Performance-based funding (PBF) is becoming increasingly popular as an accountability tool to reward higher education institutions for specific student outcomes. Despite its popularity, however, a substantial body of empirical evidence shows PBF can have troubling and unintended impacts. With this in mind, Lyle McKinney and Linda Serra Hagedorn look at the Texas Student Success Points Model.

What Will “College 2050” Look Like?

What will “College 2050” look like? A panel at the closing plenary of ACE’s 97th Annual Meeting agreed that technology and innovation can play key roles in increasing the number of first-generation and low-income students who enroll and complete their degrees. But that technology must be deployed in ways that engage students in collaborative, supportive… Read more »

VIDEO: President Obama Announces Free Community College Plan

For a summary of the proposal and media reaction, see: FRIDAY BUZZ: President Obama Proposes Two Years of Free Community College

From Access to Graduation: Supporting Post-9/11 Undergraduate Student Veterans

Given the huge investment in veterans’ postsecondary education represented by the Post-9/11 GI Bill, one could argue that veterans who use this generous benefit are in a good position to enroll in college and ultimately earn a postsecondary certificate or degree. And some do. But for veterans who didn’t finish college, what were the barriers to their success?

Innovative Partnership Breaking Down Barriers in the Science World

NPR’s CodeSwitch blog featured a great story last week on a partnership between Vanderbilt University and Fisk University—both located in Nashville—that is successfully helping women and minority students earn PhDs in the sciences.