Private College Tuition Discounts Continue to Hit Highs

According to a new report released by NACUBO, private colleges and universities are discounting their tuition revenue at the highest rates to date. By offering grants, scholarships and fellowships, the institutions that participated in the 2016 NACUBO Tuition Discounting Study averaged an estimated 49.1 percent institutional tuition discount rate for first-time, full-time students in 2016-17—the highest in the history of the survey.

A Risk Sharing Proposal for Student Loans

Authors of a recently released policy brief by The Hamilton Project argue that institutional accountability in the federal student loan program has weakened. As a solution, the authors propose the use of risk-sharing based on cohort repayment rate to increase institutional accountability.

Who Gets Pell Grants and Why It Matters

Four in 10 students receive Pell Grants to help fund their college education. A new infographic recently released by the Center for American Progress explores who receives Pell Grants and the role these grants play in higher education for low-income students.

Most Students Hold Less Than $30,000 in Debt

ACE’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy has released an updated version its Paying for College infographic as part of the Higher Education Spotlight series. This analysis unpacks information on the cost of college and how students pay for their education. Among the findings: Most undergraduate students have less than $30,000 in cumulative debt.

Temple University-APLU Completion Grants Will Help Low-Income Students Graduate

A nearly $4 million Department of Education grant will enable Temple University, in collaboration with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, to undertake an initiative focused on small-dollar grants to help cash-strapped, low-income students complete their degrees.

Between Scylla and Charybdis: Navigating the Cost of College

Even with its long-term benefits understood, the challenges for many households to afford college make it clear that the current model cannot simply continue without strategic innovation, writes Geoffrey Brackett, executive vice president of Marist College.

Waiting for the Dominoes to Fall

Uncertainty reigns in Washington, DC these days. The surprise election of Donald Trump and the resulting one-party control of the legislative and executive branches makes substantial changes in federal policy over the next two years nearly inevitable. Jon Fansmith looks at what this could mean for federal financial aid.

New Report Looks at State and Local Tuition- and Debt-Free College Plans

A new report released this week looks at 11 plans that reduce or eliminate the cost of tuition or the need to borrow to cover it, including five at the state and two at the local level. The study summarizes the work of the Task Force on Assessing Tuition- and Debt-Free Higher Education, convened last July by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

What Can Higher Education Expect From the Trump Administration?

The stunning election of Republican Donald J. Trump as the 45th president of the United States on Nov. 8 reverberated across campuses and here in Washington. Immediately people began to ask, “What does a Trump presidency mean for me and my institution?” ACE’s Jon Fansmith looks at the available evidence to see what the next four years might bring.

Legacy

As the new president takes office, it’s reasonable to assess the Obama administration’s higher education record and to ask what its legacy will be and how long it will last. In a preview of the Winter 2016 edition of The Presidency, ACE Senior Vice President Terry W. Hartle outlines five fundamental ways federal higher education policy has changed over the last eight years.

College Board Releases 2016 Reports on College Pricing, Student Aid

The College Board today released its annual Trends in Higher Education reports, one focusing on student aid and the other on tuition and fees. The reports showed moderate increases in published tuition and fees, ranging from 2.2 percent to 3.6 percent across all sectors between 2015-16 and 2016-17. However, that still exceeded the growth in… Read more »

From Foster Care to College to Career, Western Michigan Provides Pipeline of Support

For students aging out of the foster care system and going to college, the unknowns often outnumber the knowns. Western Michigan University (WMU) has set out to answer these uncertainties by providing a network of support on campus, in Michigan and across the nation.