After Decades of Pushing Bachelor’s Degrees, U.S. Needs More Tradespeople

A recent news article by Matt Krupnick of the Hechinger Report focuses on the need for more tradespeople, occupations that are increasingly in high demand.

Who Does Work Work for? Understanding Equity in Learner College and Career Success

ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning recently released a report on working learners, Who Does Work Work For? Understanding Equity in Learner College and Career Success.

The Biggest Misconception About Today’s College Students

In a recent op-ed in The New York Times, president of LaGuardia Community College and ACE Board Member Gail O. Mellow offered her perspective on today’s college students. Namely, they aren’t who you think they are, and the higher education community could help remove barriers to their success by realizing that.

Even With Affirmative Action, Blacks and Hispanics are More Underrepresented at Top Colleges Than 35 years Ago

Equitable access to a higher education remains elusive. A recent New York Times article revealed that Black and Hispanic freshman are more underrepresented at the nation’s elite colleges today than they were 35 years ago.

Diversity Among Higher Education Admission Professionals Is More Important Than Ever

As the high school population in the United States grows increasingly diverse, so too should those professionals who work on college campuses. Diversity is especially critical in college and university admission offices, write David Hawkins and Tara Nicola of the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

Looking Ahead to Diversifying the College Presidency

Despite the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that set a clearer path for women and minorities pursuing top leadership positions in both the public and private sectors, they remain underrepresented—including in higher education. A new data tool linked to ACE’s American College President Study 2017 helps explain what it will take for the presidency to reach gender and racial parity.

Iowa Regents Tuition Task Force Kicks Off

Iowa’s public universities are presenting to the state’s Board of Regents Tuition Task Force this week on their five-year proposals for tuition pricing. The Tuition Task Force “was established to facilitate public discussion regarding the issue of tuition at Iowa’s public universities” and looks to foster collaborative solutions between the state’s legislators and public universities for minimizing tuition increases.

From PostEverything: Free Tuition? Programs Should Focus on Students Who Started and Had To Stop.

A recent blog post by Sanford J. Ungar in The Washington Post discusses the need to focus policy conversations around increasing college enrollment to those who have some college education, but no degree.

Inside Higher Ed: Results from Survey of College and University Business Officers

According to the 2017 Inside Higher Ed Survey of College and University Business Officers, half of campus chief budget officers (CBOs) have significantly modified their budget model in recent years. The rationale: seven in 10 CBOs agree that media reports saying that higher education is in the midst of a financial crisis are accurate.

Study: Food Insecurity a Major Concern for Community College Students

report released this week by The Urban Institute finds that the food insecurity rate is 13.3 percent for households with students enrolled in two-year colleges. This means that nearly one in five two-year college students lives in a food-insecure household. By contrast, for households with students enrolled in four-year colleges, the rate of food insecurity is 11.2 percent.

Competency Frameworks: Blueprints for Strong Learning Structures

A recent blog post from the Lumina Foundation discusses how frameworks act as blueprints to ensure all credentials are of high quality.

Policy Levers Leading the Way to Reentry for Incarcerated Students

We know that postsecondary education changes lives and provides a stepping-stone to prosperity. Though we recognize education’s transformative power, those who stand to benefit the most are often cut off from access—especially individuals in the criminal justice system.