An Employee’s Path Through the New GEDWorks

GED Testing Service announced today that it is partnering with some of the nation’s largest employers—including Walmart, KFC, Taco Bell and Southeastern Grocers—to create GEDWorks,™ a comprehensive program free for employees who want to earn their GED credential.

Reimagining Remediation in Tennessee

With implementation of the Tennessee Promise, higher education is looking to Tennessee for lessons learned during its foray into the world of free community college. The Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) is no less a stranger to scrutiny for its innovative practices in developmental education. Tristan Denley discusses TBR’s pioneering approach to remediation.

New CSUSM Center Helps Latinos Overcome Academic Obstacles

At California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), nearly 40 percent of the student body identifies as Latino. Unfortunately, many first-generation Latino students face major hurdles to pursuing a post-secondary education. And when they do enroll, they often find the transition challenging—which is why CSUSM launched The Latin@ Center earlier this month.

Supporting First-Generation and Low-Income Students at the University of Florida

First launched in 2006, the Machen Florida Opportunity Scholars Program supports nearly 1,250 undergraduates annually and will soon surpass the 2,000 alumni milestone. For the first-generation and low-income students in the program, early estimates indicate that they are 44 percent more likely to graduate in four years and 47 percent more likely to complete in six years compared to their peers.

Maricopa Community Colleges Help Foster Youth Transition to Success

Maricopa Community Colleges (AZ) recently launched a new project aimed at creating a community of support and access for youth aging out of the foster care system. The “Bridging Success Initiative” will help foster children get into and complete college by focusing on retention, degree completion and transfer.

Institutions Using Required Reading to Forge Campus Connections

As colleges and universities gear up for the fall semester, many students are likely scrambling to finish one last task: summer reading. Many schools require incoming freshman, and sometimes the entire student body, to read one book in order to create academic and other connections across the campus community. Here’s what several of our member institutions are reading for this fall.

UC San Diego Expands College Opportunities for Native Youth

Despite increases in postsecondary enrollment over the past decade, Native American youth don’t always view college as an option. That’s why the University of California, San Diego is partnering with the Sycuan and Viejas tribes to promote college culture in the San Diego region.

Mapping New Pathways for Native Youth

While 208,838 American Indian and Alaska Native students were enrolled in college in 2012—a 17 percent increase from 2004—46 percent are first-generation and low-income, a population that often struggles with college completion. As the White House gears up for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, Christine Nelson looks at efforts to expand higher education opportunities for these students.

Delaware Universities Waiving Fees During College Application Month

From now until Nov. 21 all of Delaware’s higher education institutions are waiving application fees as part of the state’s College Application Month Campaign. Delaware’s campaign is part of the American College Application Campaign® (ACAC), a national initiative that seeks to increase the number of first-generation and low-income students who pursue postsecondary education.