General Education, the Four-Year Degree and Employment: What Needs to Change?

Which segment of the four-year degree is supposed to enhance students’ employable skills and prepare them for a job? Most would probably think, the courses in their degree major. But increasingly, employers are saying they can train employees in the specialized technical skills associated with their jobs. It’s the intangible skills that they hope will be taught by colleges and universities.

Mary Sue Coleman Tells Universities to Innovate, Disrupt, Repeat

University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman kicked off ACE’s 96th Annual Meeting Sunday afternoon with the Atwell Lecture, the traditional opening to the meeting each year. Her focus was on the need for universities to become more innovative and entrepreneurial, using her own institution and state–which was hit earlier and harder by the 2008 recession… Read more »

VIDEO: Close the Innovation Deficit

Innovation Deficit:  The gap between actual and needed federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations such as China, India and Singapore are dramatically boosting research funding to develop the next great technological and medical breakthroughs. More at www.innovationdeficit.org/. Join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #InnovationDeficit.

SUNY Aiming to Increase Access and Completion with Online Offerings

Open SUNY, a new online initiative from the State University of New York, is pioneering efforts to expand access for current and future students to the 64-campus system. The program aims to maximize access to online courses worldwide and provide students with a better opportunity to complete their degrees and achieve success in the competitive… Read more »

Now What? Some Insights From OECD’s Adult Skills Survey

We’re not learning only in the classroom anymore—and maybe we never were. A new Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development report shows that throughout the world, the workplace is a critical learning environment. The question is, what does that mean for educational policy and adult learners?