Patent Troll Legislation Could Hinder University Research and Innovation

The ability of universities to continue generating important discoveries and innovations in areas such as health and technology, research that often leads to life-saving inventions such as new drugs or groundbreaking ways to cultivate arid soil in developing countries, may rest on the outcome of a legislative battle now in Congress.

Regional Accreditors Take Steps to Improve Public Understanding of Commission Actions

Good news from the Council of Regional Accrediting Commissions (C-RAC) yesterday—the coalition announced plans to implement a common framework and understanding of terms for key actions regarding accredited institutions. Beginning this year, the terms “Warning,” “Probation,” “Show Cause,” “Withdrawal of Accreditation,” “Denial of Accreditation” and “Appeal” will be identical across regions, according to C-RAC’s plans…. Read more »

VIDEO: Nine Groups Endorse Student Achievement Measure

Nine national higher education organizations have endorsed the Student Achievement Measure (SAM), a collaborative effort by the association community to track student attendance across institutions.

VIDEO: Close the Innovation Deficit

Innovation Deficit:  The gap between actual and needed federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations such as China, India and Singapore are dramatically boosting research funding to develop the next great technological and medical breakthroughs. More at www.innovationdeficit.org/. Join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #InnovationDeficit.

U.Va. Climate Change Case Highlights Need to Protect Unpublished Research Data

The high-profile lawsuit involving former University of Virginia professor Michael Mann’s climate change research communiqués has made its way to the Supreme Court of Virginia. The case shines a light on the need for public institutions to examine whether state laws protect them against being compelled to disclose unpublished research data, scholarly communications and other internal documents.

VIDEO: How to Create and Support Diversity on Campus

Martha Kanter, under secretary at the U.S. Department of Education (above), was among the speakers at a panel discussion hosted by the Departments of Education and Justice on Sept. 27, 2013, in the wake of the June 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.

Exploding Myths: What’s Right With Regional  Accreditation

Regional accreditation—long an overlooked corner of higher education—has lately come under fire from multiple directions. It is time to address these concerns head on, and determine whether the current structure of regional accreditation, organized into six regions and seven accrediting commissions, is worth preserving or whether it is time to try something new, writes Ralph A. Wolff.

The Times Takes on STEM. What Can Higher Ed Do?

The New York Times editorial board recently took on the issue of diversity—or the lack thereof—in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as part of a larger education series. So What role should higher education play in broadening STEM participation?

Debating the Necessity for “Positive Discrimination” at the Oxford Union

The legal and societal debate over the higher education community’s use of race and ethnicity as one way to pursue diversity on college campuses isn’t confined to the United States, even if the terminology can be a bit different. Read about Ada Meloy’s experience at a recent Oxford Union debate, “This House believes positive discrimination is a necessary evil.”

Now What? Some Insights From OECD’s Adult Skills Survey

We’re not learning only in the classroom anymore—and maybe we never were. A new Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development report shows that throughout the world, the workplace is a critical learning environment. The question is, what does that mean for educational policy and adult learners?

University of Michigan President Cautions Continued Impact of Budget Cuts on Research, Urges Congress to Act

Many breathed a sigh of relief in mid-October when the federal shutdown finally came to a close after 16 days. However, University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman this week warned if Congress does not reach a compromise on federal spending, the university’s research operations will continue to remain in peril.