ACE helps institutions develop and sustain comprehensive, effective internationalization programs, believing that effective internationalization goes beyond traditional study abroad programs and international student enrollment to require a comprehensive institutional commitment that also includes curriculum, research, faculty development, and active strategies for institutional engagement.

In this series of posts, ACE staff and guest contributors explore issues central to international education and global engagement.

Contributors

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Featured Posts

When Pandemics End

Planning for the 2021–22 academic year gives us all a chance to open academic doors wider than ever before. And so far, no pandemic has caused us to do otherwise, writes Allan E. Goodman, president and CEO of the Institute of International Education.

Attracting and Retaining International Students at Community Colleges: Creating a 5-Star Experience

Community colleges were never designed for students from outside the United States, nor have they been given much attention. For that reason, if community colleges would like to attract, enroll, and retain these students, they must take deliberate and specific actions to plan and provide a five-star experience.

Can Internationalization Survive Coronavirus? You Need to See My Data.

Coronavirus has been a blow to study abroad and foreign exchange. But as Robin Helms explains, the most powerful lever for international education is not moving people back and forth. It’s what’s happening on our own campuses.

Keeping the Doors Open

The Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report  has become the catalyst for far-reaching debates about the relative competitiveness of the United States, the domestic political environment, and the impact of government policies. Brad Farnsworth takes a look at the latest edition and ACE’s planned study on the international student experience.

Resources Designed for International Students Could Also Help First-Generation Students

Campus support services for international students and first-generation students are usually separated, based on the assumption that these two groups of students have different needs. But are there benefits to joint programs?

Going, Golden, Gone? Internationalization’s Past, Present, and Future

ACE’s Robin Helms responds to Karin Fischer’s recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, “How International Education’s Golden Age Lost Its Sheen.”