Small Teaching Changes, Big Learning Benefits

As 2016 comes to a close, now is the perfect time to take stock of the fall semester’s accomplishments and put the final touches on preparation for the upcoming term. One approach is highlighted in a new article “Small Teaching Changes, Big Learning Benefits,” by Mary-Ann Winkelmes, part of the monthly Expert Series published by the Association of College and University Educators.

New From ACUE: Learning Never Ends, the Science of Students’ Brains, More

As the fall semester ramps up, read a selection of posts from the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) blog, The Q. Sign up for The ‘Q’ Newsletter for the latest news and insights about higher education teaching and learning.

Deconstructing CBE: A Different Approach

As CBE gains broader popularity and acceptance, it is becoming increasingly important to understand certain subtleties about this approach to teaching and learning that extend beyond the basics. The first of three new studies on CBE just released by ACE, Ellucian and Eduventures looks at the diversity of practice that exists across a spectrum of schools that deploy CBE.

The Prose of Participation: 15 Minutes with Julie Schrock and Steven Benko

This Q&A was originally posted on the Association of College and University Educators blog, The Q.  We started the month of August with an invigorating trip to Asheville, North Carolina, for the Lilly Conference on Designing Effective Teaching. In between a whirlwind of sessions, we asked some presenters to share their work and ideas.

How Cal State LA Promotes Civic Learning

Michael Willard, faculty director of service learning for California State University LA’s Center for Engagement, Service, and the Public Good, writes about how to prepare faculty to prepare students to be civically engaged citizens.  

ACUE Welcomes Under Secretary Ted Mitchell to Board Discussion on Effective College Instruction

Originally posted on ACUE’s Q Blog.  The Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) held its Board of Advisors meeting last week in Washington, DC, and was joined by some special guests, including a top official at the U.S. Department of Education.

The Right Credential for the Right Student at the Right Time

Credentials have proliferated in recent years to meet the diverse needs of our 21st century knowledge economy, including not only degrees, but also certificates, professional/industry certifications, licensures and badges. Deborah Seymour and Deborah Everhart write on the importance of sorting through this maze of post-secondary credentials.

Faculty Development and Student Success

“The results are in, folks. Faculty development does have an incredible effect on student success.”

Disrupting the Bachelor’s Degree

It was 2001, and Florida had a serious higher education capacity problem. One major indicator: the state hired 32,000 new teachers, but its colleges and universities combined to graduate 3,200 students with bachelor’s degrees in education that year and only about 1,600 of them actually went on to teach.

Pre-Enrollment Support Helps Military-Connected Students Succeed

Former Marine Reagan Odhner is studying economics at Stanford University (CA) and preparing for a career in international development, an interest sparked when she undertook humanitarian missions while deployed in Afghanistan.

Mastering the Art of Teaching

As ACE and the Association of College and University Educators’ launch a national effort to advance effective higher education instruction, Deborah Seymour writes on the importance of quality teaching at the college level.

Hanover Park’s Education and Work Center: Embarking on a Path of Hope

President Obama in 2014 signed the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, which helps ensure that job seekers have access to strategically coordinated education, employment, training and support services. However, in a small town in Illinois, one mayor was already spearheading the kind of strategic planning the federal mandate would soon require. ACE Fellow Kenya F. Ayers takes a look.