Capacity Building for Shared Equity Leadership

Capacity building for shared equity leadership is an ongoing investment meant to support and develop a repertoire of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to collectively lead equity-minded change efforts.

Why Climate Action Is in Higher Education’s Best Interest

Taking a leadership role on finding solutions to the climate crisis is an important way universities can remind the public that higher education benefits all of society—not just those who earn a degree, writes CU Boulder Chancellor Philip DiStefano.

Accountability for Campus Equity Is Everyone’s Work

Making progress on narrowing gaps and creating more inclusive and anti-racist campus environments means spreading the work to more faculty, staff, and administrators on campus rather than marginalizing it to one or two offices. Read the latest post on shared equity leadership from Elizabeth Holcombe and Adrianna Kezar of the University of Southern California Pullias Center for Higher Education. 

Organizing Shared Equity Leadership: How to Structure the Work

As college and university campuses continue to work to transform themselves into more equitable, just, and anti-racist spaces, leaders are grappling with the best ways to undo entrenched structural inequities. Elizabeth Holcombe and Adrianna Kezar of the Pullias Center for Higher Education look at the different shared equity leadership models that can help your campus move forward.

Let’s Educate More and Better Leaders—The World Needs Them

Good leadership can give our work and lives meaning and foster stability, unity, innovation, and equity. With so much at stake, Scott Cowen, president emeritus of Tulane University, suggests that leadership studies should be a strategic priority and part of the core curriculum at all colleges.

Meeting Gen Z: Avoiding the Demographic Cliff and Preparing for Their Future

Colleges must understand and respond both to the concerns and needs of Gen Z and the evolving demands of the marketplace—and do it fast—or they will fail, writes Allegheny College President Hilary Link.

Helping Students Explore Transfer: How Phi Theta Kappa’s Transfer Honor Roll Can Help

Earning a bachelor’s degree is not as straightforward as it used to be. As the possible pathways have opened up, students need more intentional transfer policies to guide them through.

Trauma-informed Colleges Begin With Trauma-informed Leaders

As higher education institutions move into the post-pandemic era, those with trauma-informed leaders will be better positioned to meet new challenges in creative ways while promoting safe and healthy campus communities, writes Appalachian State’s Jason Lynch.

Report Finds Lack of Representation for Women and Women of Color in the U.S. University Presidency

Title: The Women’s Power Gap at Elite Universities: Scaling the Ivory Tower Authors: Andrea Silbert, Magdalena Punty, Elizabeth Brodbine Ghoniem Source: Eos Foundation-The Women’s Power Gap Initiative and American Association of University Women A recently published report offers insights about women, particularly women of color, in the U.S. university presidency. The authors of this report… Read more »

Many American colleges should be proud of how they navigated COVID-19. The next draft of history should reflect their success.

Campuses across the country are moving toward a more a sustainable set of pandemic-response practices—a transition with which much of society is struggling. Longwood University’s Justin Pope thinks history will show that many liberal arts colleges were in the lead, both in 2020 and today.

Smith College Replaces Student Loans With Grants, Making Access and Equity a Priority

Beginning in fall 2022, Smith College will replace federal loans with institutional grants for all current and future undergraduates. Smith President Kathleen McCartney explains the three reasons that drove this decision.

Virtual Learning Can Be a Gateway to Increasing Equity in Higher Education

Much remains uncertain about what the fall 2021 semester will bring, but it’s increasingly obvious that expanded online offerings will be a welcome development—both now and for many years to come. Read more from Joseph I. Castro, chancellor of The California State University.